Acasă Etichete Prépa scientifique

Etichetă: prépa scientifique

Cours Prépa (CPGE – MPSI – 3). Subiecte de matematici generale...

A Grande école  is a specialised elite professional school that is separate from, but parallel and often connected to, the main framework of the French public university system. The grandes écoles offer teaching, research and professional training in single academic fields such as engineering, architecture, business administration, academic research, or public policy and administration. The schools only admit students through an extremely competitive examination process; a significant proportion of their graduates occupy senior positions in French business, academia, civil service and civil society.Grandes écoles primarily admit students based on their national ranking in competitive written and oral exams called concours, which are organised annually by the French central government. While anyone can register for concours, successful candidates have almost always completed two or three years of dedicated preparatory classes ('classes preparatoires') prior to admission. Most Grandes écoles are publicly funded and therefore have limited tuition costs. Some grandes écoles, especially business school (Écoles de Commerce), are organised privately, and therefore have more costly tuitions. The term Grande école originated in 1794 after the French Revolution, when the National Convention created the École normale supérieure, the mathematician Gaspard Monge and Lazare Carnot created the École centrale des travaux publics (later École Polytechnique), and the abbot Henri Grégoire created the Conservatoire national des arts et métiers.The model was probably the military academy at Mézières, of which Monge was an alumnus. The system of competitive entry was used as a means to open up higher education to more candidates based on merit. Some schools included in the category have roots in the 17th and 18th centuries and are older than the term Grande école, which dates to 1794. Their forerunners were schools aimed at graduating civil servants, such as technical officers (Ecole d'Arts et Métiers, renamed Arts et Métiers ParisTech, established in 1780), mine supervisors (École des mines de Paris established in 1783), bridge and road engineers (École royale des ponts et chaussées established in 1747), and shipbuilding engineers (École des ingénieurs-constructeurs des vaisseaux royaux established in 1741).Five military engineering academies and graduate schools of artillery were established in the 17th century in France, such as the Ecole de l'artillerie de Douai (established in 1697) and the later école du génie de Mézières (established in 1748), wherein mathematics, chemistry and sciences were already a major part of the curriculum taught by first-rank scientists such as Pierre-Simon Laplace, Charles Étienne Louis Camus, Étienne Bézout, Sylvestre-François Lacroix, Siméon Denis Poisson, Gaspard Monge (most of whom were later to form the teaching corps of École Polytechnique during the Napoleonic era).In 1802, Napoleon created the École spéciale militaire de Saint-Cyr, which is also considered a grande école, although it trains only army officers. During the 19th century, a number of higher-education grandes écoles were established to support industry and commerce, such as École Nationale Supérieure des Mines de Saint-Étienne in 1816, Ecole Supérieure de Commerce de Paris (today ESCP Business School, founded in 1819), L'institut des sciences et industries du vivant et de l'environnement (Agro ParisTech) in 1826, and École Centrale des Arts et Manufactures (École Centrale Paris) in 1829.

Protejat: Cours Prépa (CPGE – MPSI – 2). Subiecte de matematici...

A Grande école  is a specialised elite professional school that is separate from, but parallel and often connected to, the main framework of the French public university system. The grandes écoles offer teaching, research and professional training in single academic fields such as engineering, architecture, business administration, academic research, or public policy and administration. The schools only admit students through an extremely competitive examination process; a significant proportion of their graduates occupy senior positions in French business, academia, civil service and civil society.Grandes écoles primarily admit students based on their national ranking in competitive written and oral exams called concours, which are organised annually by the French central government. While anyone can register for concours, successful candidates have almost always completed two or three years of dedicated preparatory classes ('classes preparatoires') prior to admission. Most Grandes écoles are publicly funded and therefore have limited tuition costs. Some grandes écoles, especially business school (Écoles de Commerce), are organised privately, and therefore have more costly tuitions. The term Grande école originated in 1794 after the French Revolution, when the National Convention created the École normale supérieure, the mathematician Gaspard Monge and Lazare Carnot created the École centrale des travaux publics (later École Polytechnique), and the abbot Henri Grégoire created the Conservatoire national des arts et métiers.The model was probably the military academy at Mézières, of which Monge was an alumnus. The system of competitive entry was used as a means to open up higher education to more candidates based on merit. Some schools included in the category have roots in the 17th and 18th centuries and are older than the term Grande école, which dates to 1794. Their forerunners were schools aimed at graduating civil servants, such as technical officers (Ecole d'Arts et Métiers, renamed Arts et Métiers ParisTech, established in 1780), mine supervisors (École des mines de Paris established in 1783), bridge and road engineers (École royale des ponts et chaussées established in 1747), and shipbuilding engineers (École des ingénieurs-constructeurs des vaisseaux royaux established in 1741).Five military engineering academies and graduate schools of artillery were established in the 17th century in France, such as the Ecole de l'artillerie de Douai (established in 1697) and the later école du génie de Mézières (established in 1748), wherein mathematics, chemistry and sciences were already a major part of the curriculum taught by first-rank scientists such as Pierre-Simon Laplace, Charles Étienne Louis Camus, Étienne Bézout, Sylvestre-François Lacroix, Siméon Denis Poisson, Gaspard Monge (most of whom were later to form the teaching corps of École Polytechnique during the Napoleonic era).In 1802, Napoleon created the École spéciale militaire de Saint-Cyr, which is also considered a grande école, although it trains only army officers. During the 19th century, a number of higher-education grandes écoles were established to support industry and commerce, such as École Nationale Supérieure des Mines de Saint-Étienne in 1816, Ecole Supérieure de Commerce de Paris (today ESCP Business School, founded in 1819), L'institut des sciences et industries du vivant et de l'environnement (Agro ParisTech) in 1826, and École Centrale des Arts et Manufactures (École Centrale Paris) in 1829.

Protejat: Cours Prépa (CPGE – MPSI – 1). Subiecte de matematici...

A Grande école  is a specialised elite professional school that is separate from, but parallel and often connected to, the main framework of the French public university system. The grandes écoles offer teaching, research and professional training in single academic fields such as engineering, architecture, business administration, academic research, or public policy and administration. The schools only admit students through an extremely competitive examination process; a significant proportion of their graduates occupy senior positions in French business, academia, civil service and civil society. Grandes écoles primarily admit students based on their national ranking in competitive written and oral exams called concours, which are organised annually by the French central government. While anyone can register for concours, successful candidates have almost always completed two or three years of dedicated preparatory classes ('classes preparatoires') prior to admission. Most Grandes écoles are publicly funded and therefore have limited tuition costs. Some grandes écoles, especially business school (Écoles de Commerce), are organised privately, and therefore have more costly tuitions. The term Grande école originated in 1794 after the French Revolution, when the National Convention created the École normale supérieure, the mathematician Gaspard Monge and Lazare Carnot created the École centrale des travaux publics (later École Polytechnique), and the abbot Henri Grégoire created the Conservatoire national des arts et métiers. The model was probably the military academy at Mézières, of which Monge was an alumnus. The system of competitive entry was used as a means to open up higher education to more candidates based on merit. Some schools included in the category have roots in the 17th and 18th centuries and are older than the term Grande école, which dates to 1794. Their forerunners were schools aimed at graduating civil servants, such as technical officers (Ecole d'Arts et Métiers, renamed Arts et Métiers ParisTech, established in 1780), mine supervisors (École des mines de Paris established in 1783), bridge and road engineers (École royale des ponts et chaussées established in 1747), and shipbuilding engineers (École des ingénieurs-constructeurs des vaisseaux royaux established in 1741). Five military engineering academies and graduate schools of artillery were established in the 17th century in France, such as the Ecole de l'artillerie de Douai (established in 1697) and the later école du génie de Mézières (established in 1748), wherein mathematics, chemistry and sciences were already a major part of the curriculum taught by first-rank scientists such as Pierre-Simon Laplace, Charles Étienne Louis Camus, Étienne Bézout, Sylvestre-François Lacroix, Siméon Denis Poisson, Gaspard Monge (most of whom were later to form the teaching corps of École Polytechnique during the Napoleonic era). In 1802, Napoleon created the École spéciale militaire de Saint-Cyr, which is also considered a grande école, although it trains only army officers. During the 19th century, a number of higher-education grandes écoles were established to support industry and commerce, such as École Nationale Supérieure des Mines de Saint-Étienne in 1816, Ecole Supérieure de Commerce de Paris (today ESCP Business School, founded in 1819), L'institut des sciences et industries du vivant et de l'environnement (Agro ParisTech) in 1826, and École Centrale des Arts et Manufactures (École Centrale Paris) in 1829.

Protejat: Concursul Comun (de admitere „antepandemic”) al Institutelor Naționale Politehnice franceze...

Le Concours CCINP–pour „Concours communs des Instituts Nationaux Polytechniques”–est une banque d’épreuves écrites et orales, mobilisée par 33 écoles d’ingénieurs pour recruter leurs étudiants, après une classe de prépa scientifique (Maths Sup & Maths Spé). Comme les autres concours scientifiques après prépa maths sup–maths spé, il existe cinq voies d’accès au  Concours CCINP après les CPGE (Classes Préparatoires Scientifiques aux Grandes Ecoles, MP-Maths Physique, PC-Physique Chimie, PSI-Physique Science de l’Ingénieur, PT-Physique Technologie et TSI-Technologie Sciences de l’Ingénieur). Attention. A ne pas confondre le Concours CCINP avec le concours de l'École Polytechnique (également appelée „l’X”), la plus prestigieuse des écoles d’ingénieur françaises, et dispose de son propre concours. Historiquement, l’appellation „Concours Communs Polytechniques” est héritée des Instituts Nationaux Polytechniques (INP). Ces établissements regroupent plusieurs écoles, dont la plupart font encore partie aujourd’hui du concours commun. Les instituts nationaux polytechniques ont donné leur nom au concours car ils dispensent une formation d’ingénieur généraliste, „polytechniques” en quelque sorte. Note. Le Concours des „Ptittes Mines” fait partie du Concours CCINP. Autre particularité du concours CCINP, il inclut le Concours Commun des Mines d’Alès, d’Albi, de Douai et de Nantes, mais uniquement en filière TSI. Dans les autres filières, les „Petites Mines” recrutent via le concours commun Mines Ponts. Ces 4 écoles des Mines proposaient autrefois un concours commun „Mines Sup” et étaient accessibles dès bac+1. Depuis 2012 ce n’est plus le cas mais il subsiste un concours commun au sein du Concours CCINP. Les écoles des Mines d’Albi, Alès, Douai et Nantes ont progressivement perdu leur surnom de „Petites Mines” ou „Minettes” que les taupins leur donnaient par comparaison avec l’Ecole des Mines, qui n’était, elle, accessible qu’à bac+2.Attention. Comme pour les écoles qui recrutent en Banque CCINP sans faire partie du Concours au sens strict, vous devez vous inscrire séparément au Concours commun des Mines.

Protejat: Concursul Comun (de admitere „antepandemic”) al Institutelor Naționale Politehnice franceze...

Le Concours CCINP–pour „Concours communs des Instituts Nationaux Polytechniques”–est une banque d’épreuves écrites et orales, mobilisée par 33 écoles d’ingénieurs pour recruter leurs étudiants, après une classe de prépa scientifique (Maths Sup & Maths Spé). Comme les autres concours scientifiques après prépa maths sup–maths spé, il existe cinq voies d’accès au  Concours CCINP après les CPGE (Classes Préparatoires Scientifiques aux Grandes Ecoles, MP-Maths Physique, PC-Physique Chimie, PSI-Physique Science de l’Ingénieur, PT-Physique Technologie et TSI-Technologie Sciences de l’Ingénieur). Attention. A ne pas confondre le Concours CCINP avec le concours de l'École Polytechnique (également appelée „l’X”), la plus prestigieuse des écoles d’ingénieur françaises, et dispose de son propre concours. Historiquement, l’appellation „Concours Communs Polytechniques” est héritée des Instituts Nationaux Polytechniques (INP). Ces établissements regroupent plusieurs écoles, dont la plupart font encore partie aujourd’hui du concours commun. Les instituts nationaux polytechniques ont donné leur nom au concours car ils dispensent une formation d’ingénieur généraliste, „polytechniques” en quelque sorte. Note. Le Concours des „Ptittes Mines” fait partie du Concours CCINP. Autre particularité du concours CCINP, il inclut le Concours Commun des Mines d’Alès, d’Albi, de Douai et de Nantes, mais uniquement en filière TSI. Dans les autres filières, les „Petites Mines” recrutent via le concours commun Mines Ponts. Ces 4 écoles des Mines proposaient autrefois un concours commun „Mines Sup” et étaient accessibles dès bac+1. Depuis 2012 ce n’est plus le cas mais il subsiste un concours commun au sein du Concours CCINP. Les écoles des Mines d’Albi, Alès, Douai et Nantes ont progressivement perdu leur surnom de „Petites Mines” ou „Minettes” que les taupins leur donnaient par comparaison avec l’Ecole des Mines, qui n’était, elle, accessible qu’à bac+2.Attention. Comme pour les écoles qui recrutent en Banque CCINP sans faire partie du Concours au sens strict, vous devez vous inscrire séparément au Concours commun des Mines.